Into the Water: A Novel

Paula Hawkins
The author of the #1 New York Times bestseller and global phenomenon The Girl on the Train returns with Into the Water, her addictive new novel of psychological suspense. A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged.   Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother's sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from—a place to which she vowed she'd never return.   With the same propulsive writing and acute understanding of human instincts that captivated millions of readers around the world in her explosive debut thriller, The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins delivers an urgent, twisting, deeply satisfying read that hinges on the deceptiveness of emotion and memory, as well as the devastating ways that the past can reach a long arm into the present.   Beware a calm surface—you never know what lies beneath.

Reviews

Reviewed: 2017-11-16
“Beware a calm surface—you never know what lies beneath.”


As good as The Girl On The Train if not better. Plus,it had the same gloomy touch.

What I really liked about this thriller:

* All characters are pretty messed up in a very intriguing way.
* One of those rare psychological thrillers that require your undivided attention,like you really gotta
pay close attention till the very last para till the very last line.
* Seriously what happened in the end caught me off guard in such a delicious way, I was left
breathless YES it was THAT good.
* I don't think I even need to mention the captivating writing style that keeps you on the edge of your
seat till it's finished.
Highly recommended!
Reviewed: 2017-10-18
An unfair expectation lead to somewhat of a letdown. This book wasn't as good as Girl on the Train. But that's a really tough act to follow. For me, the thing I didn't like the most was the huge suicide theme. It was depressing and I don't want to read about it. There were a bunch of POV's that it switched between, but I didn't have too much trouble keeping up. Honestly, by the end I didn't even care who did it. Bad sign. Not sure I would recommend to a friend.
Reviewed: 2017-08-29
Overview #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER An addictive new novel of psychological suspense from the author of #1 New York Times bestseller and global phenomenon The Girl on the Train. "Hawkins is at the forefront of a group of female authors - think Gillian Flynn and Megan Abbott - who have reinvigorated the literary suspense novel by tapping a rich vein of psychological menace and social unease... there's a certain solace to a dark escape, in the promise of submerged truths coming to light." -Vogue A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged. Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother's sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from--a place to which she vowed she'd never return. With the same propulsive writing and acute understanding of human instincts that captivated millions of readers around the world in her explosive debut thriller, The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins delivers an urgent, twisting, deeply satisfying read that hinges on the deceptiveness of emotion and memory, as well as the devastating ways that the past can reach a long arm into the present. Beware a calm surface--you never know what lies beneath. Editorial Reviews Publishers Weekly 03/20/2017 Jules Abbott, the heroine of bestseller Hawkins's twisty second psychological thriller, vowed never to return to the sleepy English town of Beckford after an incident when she was a teenager drove a wedge between her and her older sister, Nel. But now Nel, a writer and photographer, is the latest in a long string of women found dead in a part of the local river known as the Drowning Pool. As Nel put it, "Beckford is not a suicide spot. Beckford is a place to get rid of troublesome women." Before Nel's death, the best friend of her surly 15-year-old daughter, Lena, drowned herself, an act that had a profound effect on both Nel and Lena. Beckford history is dripping with women who've thrown themselves--or been pushed?--off the cliffs into the Drowning Pool, and everyone--from the police detective, plagued by his own demons, working the case to the new cop in town with something to prove--knows more than they're letting on. Hawkins (The Girl on the Train) may be juggling a few too many story lines for comfort, but the payoff packs a satisfying punch. Author tour. Agent: Lizzy Kremer, David Higham Associates (U.K.). (May) USA Today Succulent new mystery... Hawkins, influenced by Hitchcock, has a cinematic eye and an ear for eerie, evocative language... So do dive in. The payoff is a socko ending. And a noirish beach read that might make you think twice about dipping a toe in those dark, chilly waters. Wall Street Journal Highly suspenseful... all these intrigues are teased out with impressive skill by Ms. Hawkins, who tells a complex narrative...in a chronicle whose final pages yield startling revelations. W Magazine If you prefer your page-turners with a heart of darkness, then consider Paula Hawkins's follow-up to her much-lauded Girl on the Train... Hawkins constructs a bracing, knotty ride in which the ghosts of the past come back to haunt those living in the present. New York Post There's no denying that when it comes to tension you could cut with a knife, no one does it better than Hawkins. Harpers Bazaar [INTO THE WATER] contains just as many hair-raising plot twists as the first. This time, Hawkins's absorbing and chilling cast of mothers, daughters, and sisters grapples with the implications of memory, exploring what happens when our conflicting recollections of personal histories collide to destroy the present. Minneapolis Star-Tribune Into the Water" captures all the suspense and terrifying emotions of the first, but it beams with a maturity in writing and in storytelling that will draw her fans right back over the edge... the novel also flows with an instinctual understanding of relationships, young love, devoted friendships and dedication to duty, familial faults and small-town paranoia. Every character is believable. The actions seem right and real, even when you don't see them coming. Prepare to settle in with the sisters of the water. The river tells the village's story as surely as the lifeline on your palm. From the Publisher "A captivating contemporary whodunit... suspense churns and the plot keeps you guessing."--People Magazine "Highly suspenseful... all these intrigues are teased out with impressive skill by Ms. Hawkins, who tells a complex narrative... in a chronicle whose final pages yield startling revelations." --The Wall Street Journal "[A] succulent new mystery... Hawkins, influenced by Hitchcock, has a cinematic eye and an ear for eerie, evocative language... So do dive in. The payoff is a socko ending. And a noirish beach read that might make you think twice about dipping a toe in those dark, chilly waters."--USA Today "Addicting... this novel has a little something for anyone looking for their next binge-read." --Marie Claire "Thrilling... we [are] kept guessing until the sobering conclusion." --O Magazine "Mother's Day is coming up. This one's perfect for the mom who always has shelf space for thrillers." --theSkimm "Hawkins is at the forefront of a group of female authors - think Gillian Flynn and Megan Abbott - who have reinvigorated the literary suspense novel by tapping a rich vein of psychological menace and social unease... there's a certain solace to a dark escape, in the promise of submerged truths coming to light." --Vogue "A unputdownable, smart, thoughtful thriller."--PopSugar "An intriguing pop-feminist tale of small-town hypocrisy, sexual politics, and wrongs that won't rinse clean."--Entertainment Weekly "Contains just as many hair-raising plot twists as [The Girl on the Train]. This time, Hawkins's absorbing and chilling cast of mothers, daughters, and sisters grapples with the implications of memory, exploring what happens when our conflicting recollections of personal histories collide to destroy the present." --Harper's Bazaar "Hawkins weaves another wonderfully twisted mystery."--Coastal Living "Page-turner... a thriller that intersects complicated cultural narratives of adolescent sexuality, the often fraught relationships between daughters, mothers and sisters, and the relationship between 'good men' and 'troublesome women.'"--Jezebel "Hawkins has a real gift for exploring the manner in which we constantly turn things over in our minds, crafting inner monologues both rich and relatable... a lively, compelling, and surprisingly empathetic and humane page-turner." --The A.V. Club "A page-turning thriller... Will haunt you long after this book is over." --Bustle "I couldn't resist Hawkins' anxiously awaited second novel ... scary and addictive." --Cup of Jo "Hawkins constructs a bracing, knotty ride in which the ghosts of the past come back to haunt those living in the present." -W Magazine "Hawkins keeps you guessing until the final page." --Real Simple "Arresting... Hawkins is an ambitious writer, inclining to the literary end of the spectrum."--Financial Times "Into the Water" captures all the suspense and terrifying emotions of [The Girl on the Train], but it beams with a maturity in writing and in storytelling that will draw her fans right back over the edge... the novel also flows with an instinctual understanding of relationships, young love, devoted friendships and dedication to duty, familial faults and small-town paranoia." --Minneapolis Star-Tribune "When it comes to tension you could cut with a knife, no one does it better than Hawkins."--New York Post "An elegantly written tale that grips readers like a mighty current, guiding and taking them downriver toward the inevitable rocky ending and breathtaking plot twist in the novel's final pages." --Deseret News "Hawkins is a master of waging emotional warfare among her characters against a backdrop of murder. Into the Water is one to read with the lights on."--SF Weekly "Hawkins returns to the rotating-narration style of her breakout debut, giving voice to an even broader cast this time... Order by the ton." --Booklist (starred review) "Twisty and compulsive... Hawkins skillfully delves into the psyche of each character, extracting their feelings, fears and fallacies, slowly ramping up the psychological suspense as she goes." --BookPage "The payoff packs a satisfying punch." --Publishers Weekly Library Journal 04/15/2017 Jules Abbott receives word that her sister Nel has drowned and returns to her hometown. Since she and Nel were estranged for decades, Jules had never met her teenage niece, who responds to her visit with rancor and mistrust. There is speculation surrounding Nel's death, with some calling it accidental and others suspecting suicide. Rumors swirl among the townspeople, linking Nel to the long history of women who have drowned over the years, this sinister sisterhood lost to the Drowning Pool. As the police conduct their investigation, Jules mounts her own informal one. Piecing together clues from the townspeople, Jules unearths decades-old mysteries and finds secrets from her own past bubbling to the surface. In the popular tradition of her best-selling debut, The Girl on the Train, Hawkins guides readers through a muddled labyrinth of twists and turns, secrets and lies, and misdirections that will ultimately reveal the sordid details of three deaths before its surprising conclusion. VERDICT A must-have for fans of twisty thrillers. [See Prepub Alert, 12/5/16; "Editors' Spring Picks," LJ 2/15/17.]--Mary Todd Chesnut, Northern Kentucky Univ. Lib., Highland Heights Kirkus Reviews 2017-02-06 Women in a small British town have been drowning since 1679. "No one liked to think about the fact that the water in that river was infected with the blood and bile of persecuted women, unhappy women; they drank it every day." So sayeth the town psychic in Hawkins' (The Girl on the Train, 2015) follow-up to her smash-hit debut. Unfortunately, there's nothing here to match the sharp characterization of the alcoholic commuter at the center of that story. Here the central character--Danielle Abbott, an award-winning writer and photographer who's also the single mother of a teenager--has already died. At the time of her watery demise, she was working on a coffee-table book about the spot the people of Beckford call the Drowning Pool, once her "place of ecstasy," where she learned to swim, now her grave. She left behind a pile of typewritten pages and a daughter whose best friend also drowned just a few months ago. Danielle's estranged sister, Jules, returns to town to identify the body, relive the distressing past that led her to flee this creepy place, and try to deal with her snotty, grieving niece, Lena. Many of the neighbor families are also down a member via the pool, and even after you've managed to untangle all the willfully misleading information, half-baked subplots, and myriad characters, you're going to have a tough time keeping it straight. The spunkiest voice belongs to a somewhat tangential policewoman who probably should have been the narrator. "Seriously," she comments, "how is anyone supposed to keep track of all the bodies around here? It's like Midsomer Murders, only with accidents and suicides and grotesque historical misogynistic drownings instead of people falling into the slurry or bashing each other over the head." Let's call it sophomore slump and hope for better things.
Reviewed: 2017-06-29

I enjoyed this book, but compared to The Girl on The Train, did not love it. This book jumps back and forth between different characters point of views. Jules Abbott comes back home to take care of her dead sister's daughter. The book basically is about solving Nel death. Was she killed or did she jump to her death. Nel was writing a book about the different woman on the area who were drowned near the rivers in town. Did she find something out, and was murdered to keep quiet? You also follow the Whittaker family. Louise's daughter Katie was friends with Lena (Nel's daughter). When Katie drowns herself in the river Louise blames Nel and Lena for her death. There is also the Townsend family, who also have the pain of losing someone in the river. The families grief all intertwine and blame and accusations are thrown around. You do eventually learn how Nel dies, along with the backstory to all the other tragic ends of the other ladies who meet their end at the river.

~April

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