Pact: A Love Story, The

Jodi Picoult
Until the phone calls came at three o'clock on a November morning, the Golds and their neighbors, the Hartes, had been inseparable. It was no surprise to anyone when their teenage children, Chris and Emily, began showing signs that their relationship was moving beyond that of lifelong friends. But now seventeen-year-old Emily is dead&#8212shot with a gun her beloved and devoted Chris pilfered from his father's cabinet as part of an apparent suicide pact&#8212leaving two devastated families stranded in the dark and dense predawn, desperate for answers about an unthinkable act and the children they never really knew. From New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult&#8212one of the most powerful writers in contemporary fiction&#8212comes a riveting, timely, heartbreaking, and terrifying novel of families in anguish and friendships ripped apart by inconceivable violence.

Reviews

Reviewed: 2017-11-16
Never take the gift of love lightly.

How far would you go to ease away your beloved's pain?
How far would you go in love?
It's intense.
It's an emotional roller-coaster ride.
So brace yourselves.

“I love you," he whispered, and that was the moment he knew what he was going to do. When you loved someone, you put their needs before your own. No matter how inconceivable those needs were; no matter how fucked up; no matter how much it made you feel like you were ripping yourself into pieces.

A dead girl,an injured boy.
The gun belongs to him.
He put two bullets in it but why didn't he use the second bullet?
Why are there signs of violence?
He claims to be in love with her,he is mourning her death.
But why does the evidence indicate murder?

“She was all the things I wasn't. And i was all the things she wasn't. she could paint circles around anyone; I couldn't even draw a straight line. She was never into sports; I've always been. Her hand, it fit mine.”

Emily & Chris.Their parents,Hartes & Golds,have been neighbours+close friends for eighteen years.
They are happy for Emily and Chris to be lovers,they have always wanted that to happen.
But a midnight call changes everything.

"Fusion."He smiled at the jury."It means that two personalites have bonded together so strongly that a whole new personality is created,and the separate ones cease to exist."

It's hard for me to review this book.It's great.It gave me goose bumps at times.It made me cry.It made me shiver.
What made it special?
~The unusual plot,the story
~The writing style
~The well-written characters
~The special bond Emily & Chris shared
~It affected me in ways no other book did.

"What do I do to bring him back?"
"You don't have to do anything.He'll come around."
"How do you know that?"
"Because you're two halves of a whole."

Highly recommended!
Reviewed: 2017-08-29
Book Description Until the phone calls came at three o'clock on a November morning, the Golds and their neighbors, the Hartes, had been inseparable. It was no surprise to anyone when their teenage children, Chris and Emily, began showing signs that their relationship was moving beyond that of lifelong friends. But now seventeen-year-old Emily is dead-shot with a gun her beloved and devoted Chris pilfered from his father's cabinet as part of an apparent suicide pact-leaving two devastated families stranded in the dark and dense predawn, desperate for answers about an unthinkable act and the children they never really knew. From New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult-one of the most powerful writers in contemporary fiction-comes a riveting, timely, heartbreaking, and terrifying novel of families in anguish and friendships ripped apart by inconceivable violence. Editorial Reviews From Publishers Weekly Teenage suicide is the provocative topic that Picoult plumbs, with mixed results, in her fifth novel. Popular high-school swimming star Chris Harte and talented artist Em Gold bonded as infants; their parents have been next-door neighbors and best friends for 18 years. When they fall in love, everyone is ecstatic. Everyone, it turns out, except for Em, who finds that sex with Chris feels almost incestuous. Her emotional turmoil, compounded by pregnancy, which she keeps secret, leads to depression, despair and a desire for suicide, and she insists that Chris prove his love by pulling the trigger. The gun is fired in the first paragraph, and so the book opens with a jolt of adrenaline. But Picoult stumbles in delineating both sets of parents' responses to the tragedy. Unconvincing behavior and dialogue inappropriate to the situation (plus, most importantly, the fact that the parents fail to discuss crucial topics) never touch the essence of bereavement and thus destroy credibility. Picoult redeems herself in flashbacks that reveal the two marital relationships and the personalities of both couples; and she sensitively explores the question of how well parents can ever know their children. After Chris is accused of murder and jailed, the narrative acquires impressive authenticity and suspense, with even the minor characters evoked with Picoult's keen eye for telling detail. The courtroom scenes (reminiscent of Picoult's 1996 novel, Mercy), are taut and well paced. Readers may remain unconvinced, however, that an intelligent young man like Chris would not have sought some help rather than respond to his lover's desperate request. Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club selections; foreign rights sold in Germany, France, Poland and Norway. Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. From Booklist Picoult is a writer of high energy and conviction who has, in her fifth novel, brought to life a cast of subtly drawn characters caught up in a tragedy as timeless and resonant as those of the Greeks or Shakespeare. That is not to say that Picoult is anything but accessible; in fact, this psychologically shrewd tale is as suspenseful as any best-selling legal thriller. The Hartes and the Golds, professional folk living next door in an affluent New Hampshire town, are close friends, and their children, the Hartes' son, Chris, and Emily Gold, were born just weeks apart. Inseparable all through childhood, they slipped from the haven of intimate friendship into the tempestuous realm of love in high school, a transition their parents fully expected and welcomed. But Emily is secretly appalled by the incestuous nature of her relationship with Chris, and when she discovers that she is pregnant, she can imagine only one solution: suicide. Chris is with her when she dies and is consequently charged with her murder. As Picoult takes us through the nightmare that follows, examining each character's struggle with guilt and sorrow, she forges a finely honed, commanding, and cathartic drama. Donna Seaman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
Reviewed: 2016-05-31
Part One of this book was tedious and I really struggled with it, Part Two was better and Part Three (the court case) was great. At times I found this book depressing as it made you realise that, as a parent, no matter how well you think you know your own children, you really don't. A sad story but not one of Picoult's better novels.
Reviewed: 2015-07-15

First, the writing was excellent, as I've come to expect from a Picoult title. I enjoyed the story and felt it carried a deeper meaning than what was touched on the surface. I could understand why the relationship between Chris and Emily could be both poignant and troublesome. And although I felt each of the characters, with the exception on Emily, were well drawn, I did feel there were times they acted a bit out of character. Another thing that troubled me once finished was the unanswered questions. For one, I felt as though the author set us up with a promise in the diary found by her mother, but was let down when she didn't deliver. I felt the diary showed both the love between them, and Emily's confused state of mind. Neither was mentioned again. Had the diary resurfaced, or even the mention of it, as it surely would have in a thorough investigation, it could have swayed not only the other people closely involved, but the course of the trial, early on. I also found the unusual closeness between Gus and Michael a little unsettling. Again, a glimpse at something that was taken away abruptly. Granted, events would dictate that outcome of that relationship, but events would have also dictated it to be wrong from the onset.

I know the author included the 'restroom' scene to make the reader more aware of why Emily had some of the feelings she did, but I thought it helped to complicate the issues. Did she has a hard time with the sexual nature of her relationship with Chris because she felt it had crossed some imaginary line between siblings to lovers, or was it because of the unexplored emotions brought on by the restroom encounter. I felt that should have been brought forward to make many other things clear, especially since Emily wasn't there to clear them for herself.

Again, superbly written, but not one of my favorite Picoult books. I would have liked to have more questions answered and gotten more insight into Emily. Not everyone is as anal with unanswered questions as I am, so for most, a worthy read.

Item Posts
No posts