Sutton

J.R. Moehringer
"Electrifying." --Booklist (starred)Willie Sutton was born in the Irish slums of Brooklyn in 1901, and he came of age at a time when banks were out of control. Sutton saw only one way out and only one way to win the girl of his dreams. So began the career of America's most successful bank robber. During three decades Sutton became so good at breaking into banks, the FBI put him on its first-ever Most Wanted List. But the public rooted for the criminal who never fired a shot, and when Sutton was finally caught for good, crowds at the jail chanted his name.In J.R. Moehringer's retelling, it was more than need or rage that drove Sutton. It was his first love. And when he finally walked free--a surprise pardon on Christmas Eve, 1969--he immediately set out to find her."What Hilary Mantel did for Thomas Cromwell and Paula McLain for Hadley Hemingway . . . J.R. Moehringer now does for bank robber Willie Sutton." --Newsday"Thoroughly absorbing. . . . Filled with vibrant and colorful re-creations of not one but several times in the American past." --Kevin Baker, author of Strivers Row"[J.R. Moehringer] has found an historical subject equal to his vivid imagination, gimlet journalistic eye, and pitch-perfect ear for dialogue. By turns suspenseful, funny, romantic, and sad--in short, a book you won't be able to put down." --John Burnham Schwartz, author of Reservation Road and The Commoner

Reviews

Reviewed: 2017-07-23

Although Sutton is a work of fiction, the historical elements are so rich in detail that by the end of the book, you’ll feel as though you’ve just relived a piece of history. Willie Sutton is a hero, and an anti-hero. He is loved, and he is hated. You’ll root for him, feel for him, and feel like you know him long before you reach the end.

The pros: almost everything about the book. The flow kept me turning pages right until the end. At no point did I grow bored with unnecessary filler or dead spots. Moehringer’s writing is a pleasurable, easy read, which makes use of the “write tight” lesson. There isn’t a wasted word in the entire novel. He pulls you into his created world with remarkable characters and vivid detail, but never presents so much as to ruin it for the reader or cause the book to feel over-inflated. I cannot imagine anyone walking away from this read with more negatives than positives to say about it.

The cons: I only have one negative to say about Sutton. The author uses no dialogue tags or quotation marks. He does this consistently throughout the book, which makes it a bit easier to adjust, but there were a couple passages where I did have to stop reading to go back and pick up the trail of who was speaking because after so many volleys, I lost track. Although the personalities of the characters were identifiable enough to know who was who, the dialogue of 1930s “bad guys” was similar enough that tags would have helped to distinguish speakers during certain conversations.

I’m not going to delve into the plot or storyline, as the synopsis does that. This is simply my take on the read. Overall, I would highly recommend Sutton to anyone, but especially those who are drawn to historical novels. I enjoyed it so much that yesterday I went to B&N to buy The Tender Bar, an earlier and highly acclaimed novel by the same author.

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