Inferno: A Novel (Robert Langdon)

Dan Brown
In his international blockbusters The Da Vinci Code, Angels & Demons, and The Lost Symbol, Dan Brown masterfully fused history, art, codes, and symbols. In this riveting new thriller, Brown returns to his element and has crafted his highest-stakes novel to date.In the heart of Italy, Harvard professor of symbology, Robert Langdon, is drawn into a harrowing world centered on one of history’s most enduring and mysterious literary masterpieces . . . Dante’s Inferno.Against this backdrop, Langdon battles a chilling adversary and grapples with an ingenious riddle that pulls him into a landscape of classic art, secret passageways, and futuristic science. Drawing from Dante’s dark epic poem, Langdon races to find answers and decide whom to trust . . . before the world is irrevocably altered.From the Hardcover edition.

Reviews

Reviewed: 2019-05-17
While I admired and applaud his efforts to work some Turkish into the book during the scenes set in Istanbul, and I definitely enjoyed the nice amounts of Italian and the way he translated them unobtrusively earlier in the book, I found that I could no longer suspend my disbelief after about two-thirds of the way through the book, and just wanted to find out how it ended, only to get whip-lash at the irritating plot twists toward the very end of the book. This one was symbology and working to save the world taken, for me, just a little bit too far.
Reviewed: 2018-10-06
2
Reviewed: 2018-04-21
Better than Lost symbol but still lost the oh that was the first two.
Reviewed: 2017-08-29
Book Description In his international blockbusters The Da Vinci Code, Angels & Demons, and The Lost Symbol, Dan Brown masterfully fused history, art, codes, and symbols. In this riveting new thriller, Brown returns to his element and has crafted his highest-stakes novel to date. In the heart of Italy, Harvard professor of symbology, Robert Langdon, is drawn into a harrowing world centered on one of history's most enduring and mysterious literary masterpieces . . . Dante's Inferno. Against this backdrop, Langdon battles a chilling adversary and grapples with an ingenious riddle that pulls him into a landscape of classic art, secret passageways, and futuristic science. Drawing from Dante's dark epic poem, Langdon races to find answers and decide whom to trust . . . before the world is irrevocably altered. From the Hardcover edition. Editorial Reviews Amazon.com Review Amazon Exclusive: Inside Inferno Explore the sights of Inferno alongside Robert Langdon in this exclusive first look at Dan Brown's latest thriller. As Langdon continued on toward the elbow of the square, he could see, directly ahead in the distance, the shimmering blue glass dial of the St. Mark's Clock Tower--the same astronomical clock through which James Bond had thrown a villain in the film Moonraker. From Publishers Weekly The threat of world overpopulation is the latest assignment for Brown's art historian and accidental sleuth Robert Langdon. Awakening in a Florence hospital with no memory of the preceding 36 hours, Langdon and an attractive attending physician with an oversized intellect are immediately pursued by an ominous underground organization and the Italian police. Detailed tours of Florence, Venice, and Istanbul mean to establish setting, but instead bog down the story and border on showoffmanship. Relying on a deceased villain's trail of clues threaded through the text of Dante's The Divine Comedy, the duo attempt to unravel the events leading up to Langdon's amnesia and thwart a global genocide scheme. Suspension of disbelief is required as miraculous coincidences pile upon pure luck. Near the three-quarters point everything established gets upended and Brown, hoping to draw us in deeper, nearly drives us out. Though the prose is fast-paced and sharp, the burdensome dialogue only serves plot and back story, and is interspersed with unfortunate attempts at folksy humor. It's hard not to appreciate a present day mega-selling thriller that attempts a refresher course in Italian literature and European history. But the real mystery is in the book's denouement and how Brown can possibly bring his hero back for more. Agent: Heide Lange, Sanford J. Greenberger Associates. (May)
Reviewed: 2017-02-08
3.79
Reviewed: 2017-01-17
The Langdon Adventure formula may make this read a pleasure for die-hard Dan Brown fans, but Inferno's absurd twists and anti-climactic ending will leave others with a far weaker experience than previous books in the series.
Reviewed: 2016-12-28

fun to read

Reviewed: 2015-05-14
A decent plot line ruined by shitty writing. This is my first Dan Brown book I've read and I don't get the hype at all. A professor wakes up in a hospital not remembering the past few days and all hell breaks lose. Someone comes in with a gun, Robert and a doctor run off realizing people are after him then realize his own government is after him. It all has to do with a message about population control and Dante's Inferno. You read 300 pages of the book and then find out within the last 100 that nothing is what it seems, everyone you were made out to believe was a "good guy" isn't and basically no one is who they were portrayed they are. This is not shocking or twisting, this is just the author being deceiving in his writing to make the readers think one thing because that is how he tells it and then does a 180 with the character not leaving any context in the previous chapters to back this up. Besides the "shocking twist" the rest of the book is filled with awful one liners like the characters on a bad 80s detective show and endless pages describing art and surroundings. Fascinating... The actual plot is decent, odd-ball scientist who has a weird obsession with Dante and the black plague thinks population is growing too fast and needs to be solved right away. Rather than go about in a rational or non melodramatic way he plans out a search using Dante's Inferno as the map to lead where he planted his engineered virus to solve over-poplulation. Which leads to the recruitment of Robert Langdon to solve the map while having a organization block him from doing so by deceiving him but still want him to solve it for them. I like how at the end it was too late, only redeeming quality about the end of the novel. This is not something I plan to reread and will definitely not read anymore Dan Brown books.
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