2312

Kim Stanley Robinson
The year is 2312. Scientific and technological advances have opened gateways to an extraordinary future. Earth is no longer humanity's only home; new habitats have been created throughout the solar system on moons, planets, and in between. But in this year, 2312, a sequence of events will force humanity to confront its past, its present, and its future.The first event takes place on Mercury, on the city of Terminator, itself a miracle of engineering on an unprecedented scale. It is an unexpected death, but one that might have been foreseen. For Swan Er Hong, it is an event that will change her life. Swan was once a woman who designed worlds. Now she will be led into a plot to destroy them.

Reviews

Reviewed: 2016-12-27

This book is beyond EPIC. It's huge, elaborate, ambitious, and technical. You have to put some work into getting through it, but ultimately I enjoyed it a great deal. The level of detail is quite incredible.
-mm

Reviewed: 2013-09-20
Adored this. I loved Swan, she was petulant and selfish and not in the slightest perfect. I can see why a lot of people don't. I wish we'd got to know Alex more, perhaps there's another book out there for that. Alex and Mquaret's story, and the genesis of Terminator, would be a fun read. On the other hand, I like being dropped into a fully developed universe that feels like it really exists, fully formed. I enjoyed the asides, the lists etc, but again, I can see why a lot of people don't. I prefer it to the conceit of "Blah character sits in a coffee shop and thinks about random things like the political makeup of the entire solar system, until his thoughts are suddenly jerked back to the present by someone shooting at him". It's exposition, it has to be done, may as well put a flag on it (and then do it with some style). And I think I mostly love the idea of the reanimation as a totally subversive and illegal act. Brilliant, and beautiful. Now I think I need to go back and re-read the Mars trilogy, and then go hunt down everything else KSR has written, I forgot how much I flat out enjoy his writing.
Reviewed: 2013-06-19
Adored this. I loved Swan, she was petulant and selfish and not in the slightest perfect. I can see why a lot of people don't. I wish we'd got to know Alex more, perhaps there's another book out there for that. Alex and Mquaret's story, and the genesis of Terminator, would be a fun read. On the other hand, I like being dropped into a fully developed universe that feels like it really exists, fully formed. I enjoyed the asides, the lists etc, but again, I can see why a lot of people don't. I prefer it to the conceit of "Blah character sits in a coffee shop and thinks about random things like the political makeup of the entire solar system, until his thoughts are suddenly jerked back to the present by someone shooting at him". It's exposition, it has to be done, may as well put a flag on it (and then do it with some style). [And I think I mostly love the idea of the reanimation as a totally subversive and illegal act. Brilliant, and beautiful.] Now I think I need to go back and re-read the Mars trilogy, and then go hunt down everything else KSR has written, I forgot how much I flat out enjoy his writing.
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